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angrycpht:

Join the exciting, never changing field if retail pharmacy! There’s never a dull moment with the constant complaining of your coworker and customers. There’s always someone to talk to with the constant ringing of the telephones, and you never have to learn anything more than how to tell someone of…

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kateoplis:

A Ghost Heart, ready to be injected with a transplant recipient’s stem cells so a new heart — one that won’t be rejected — can be grown.
"Take a pig heart, soak it in an ingredient commonly found in shampoo and wash away the cells until you’re left with a protein scaffold that is to a heart what two-by-four framing is to a house.
Then inject that ghost heart, as it’s called, with hundreds of millions of blood or bone-marrow stem cells from a person who needs a heart transplant, place it in a bioreactor - a box with artificial lungs and tubes that pump oxygen and blood into it - and wait as the ghost heart begins to mature into a new, beating human heart.
Doris Taylor, director of regenerative medicine research at the Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston, has been working on this — first using rat hearts, then pig hearts and human hearts — for years. …
'The nice thing about this technology,' Taylor says, 'is that it will work with any organ or tissue. So it's not just about hearts.'”
Ghost heart [spectacularuniverse]

kateoplis:

A Ghost Heart, ready to be injected with a transplant recipient’s stem cells so a new heart — one that won’t be rejected — can be grown.

"Take a pig heart, soak it in an ingredient commonly found in shampoo and wash away the cells until you’re left with a protein scaffold that is to a heart what two-by-four framing is to a house.

Then inject that ghost heart, as it’s called, with hundreds of millions of blood or bone-marrow stem cells from a person who needs a heart transplant, place it in a bioreactor - a box with artificial lungs and tubes that pump oxygen and blood into it - and wait as the ghost heart begins to mature into a new, beating human heart.

Doris Taylor, director of regenerative medicine research at the Texas Heart Institute at St. Luke’s Episcopal Hospital in Houston, has been working on this — first using rat hearts, then pig hearts and human hearts — for years. …

'The nice thing about this technology,' Taylor says, 'is that it will work with any organ or tissue. So it's not just about hearts.'”

Ghost heart [spectacularuniverse]

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)